Posts tagged ‘Arabic’

April 15, 2015

The name of God

I wanted to post this for a long time. The reason is because from what I know now is of importance to mostly the ‘Western Hemisphere’. Of most importance to get across for me in this blog today is the name “ALLAH”. This name is a beautiful name of God in Arabic. It is also the ONLY way to call him “GOD” in Arabic. Just like we say “GOD” in English, the same holds true in Arabic. Muslims don’t hold the sole right to call God “Allah” just like Christians don’t either. It is the universal name of God in Arabic.
So for education purposes I wanted to share this with you. I am also including a great excerpt from Wikipedia.org about the many understandings of the name ALLAH below:

**Allah (English pronunciation: /ˈælə/ or /ˈɑːlə/;[1] Arabic: الله‎ Allāh, IPA: [ʔalˤˈlˤɑːh] ( listen)) is the Arabic word for God (al ilāh, literally “the God”).The word has cognates in other Semitic languages, including Elah in Aramaic, ʾĒl in Canaanite and Elohim in Hebrew.

It is used mainly by Muslims to refer to God in Islam,but it has also been used by Arab Christians since pre-Islamic times. It is also often, albeit not exclusively, used by Bábists, Bahá’ís, Indonesian and Maltese Christians, and Mizrahi Jews. Christians and Sikhs in West Malaysia also use and have used the word to refer to God. This has caused political and legal controversies there as the law in West Malaysia prohibits non-Islamic uses of the word.

The Aramaic word for “God” in the language of Assyrian Christians is ʼĔlāhā, or Alaha. Arabic-speakers of all Abrahamic faiths, including Christians and Jews, use the word “Allah” to mean “God”. The Christian Arabs of today have no other word for “God” than “Allah”.(Even the Arabic-descended Maltese language of Malta, whose population is almost entirely Roman Catholic, uses Alla for “God”.) Arab Christians, for example, use the terms Allāh al-ab (الله الأب) for God the Father, Allāh al-ibn (الله الابن) for God the Son, and Allāh al-rūḥ al-quds (الله الروح القدس) for God the Holy Spirit.**

I hope this helps when from now on you hear the word Allah, you realize that it is the beautiful name of God in the Middle-East and other parts of the world.

I also wanted to iterate the fact that God’s name should never be taken in vain, Exodus 20. This is where the 10 commandments lye and the respect, reverence and holiness of our Father should never be taken lightly or in vain.

Blessings

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May 25, 2010

My last name

Pretty cool.  I was looking up information about the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and found my last name referenced. To that end, I clicked on the link in wiki and found this about my last name and felt pretty proud! 😀

Sharīf (Arabic: شريف‎ /šarīf/) or Chérif is a traditional Arab tribal title given to those who serve as the protector of the tribe and all tribal assets, such as property, wells, and land. In origin, the word is an adjective meaning “noble”, “highborn”. The feminine singular is sharifa(h) (شريفه /šarīfa/). The masculine plural is Ashraf (اشراف /ašrāf/).

Primarily Sunnis in the Arab world reserve the term sharif for descendants of Hasan ibn Ali, while sayyid is used for descendants of Husayn ibn Ali. Both Hasan and Husayn are grandchildren of Prophet Muhammad, through the marriage of his cousin Ali and his daughter Fatima. However ever since the post-Hashemite era began, the term sayyid has been used to denote descendants from both Hasan and Husayn. Arab Shiites use the terms sayyid and habib to denote descendants from both Hasan and Husayn; see also ashraf.

From 1201 until the Hejaz was conquered by Ibn Saud in 1925, this family held the office of the Sharīf of Makkah, often also carrying the title and office of King of Hejaz. Descendants now rule the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, the name being taken from the Banu Hashim, the sub-tribe of Banu Quraish, to which Prophet Muhammad belonged.

The word has no etymological connection with the English term sheriff, which comes from the Old English word scīrgerefa, meaning “shire-reeve,” the local reeve (enforcement agent) of the king in the shire (county).

Sharif, however, is the Arabic/Persian word for “honorable”.

August 13, 2008

West Coast Christian

I grew up in a Muslim culture with my dad and his side of the family in Southern California.  My parents were divorced when I was about 3 or 4.  I had chosen to live with my dad and did so for most of my adolescent years.  I had accepted or at least tried the Muslim faith for a short period of time when I was about 14 or so.  I did realize quickly that it wasn’t for me though.  However, there was still the Arabic influence in my life that I loved: the food, my family, speaking Arabic, etc.

This story about a young man growing up Muslim in the West Bank(Israel/Palestine) and now seeking asylum in Southern California(United States) and attending a Christian Church and forsaking the religion he was brought up with reminds me of my past history and growing up in a similar fashion. 

This has conjured up many thoughts, feelings, memories and emotions.  I’m very proud of this young man for doing what he has done.  The fact is, when you do what he has done, your family forever forsakes you as well.  It’s the culture that dictates this.  Although, his mother might still want to love on him, I’m sure, the fact is, he has left everything he knows to accept, embrace and share his faith in Jesus Christ.  Praise God!!

This brings me to another point.  That is how blessed and privileged we are to live in the United States of America and enjoy the freedoms that were bought by blood by our forefathers to give us the life we have today.  This young man received it and relishes in the beauty of Freedom!  Long Live Freedom!! 

We as Americans, should be more thankful and grateful that we have the rights we do have to practice whatever religion you want in our God Blessed Country, the great USA!  We all have this right, and I know that I’m grateful for it.

I am honored and wowed by this story and hope you read it all, because it is very enlightening and inspiring.  It just hit me so hard and not growing up in “The Church”, but accepting Christ when I was in my early 20’s, Jesus is someone whom I will never forsake or take for granted, especially seeing many sides of life, and other faiths and realizing that He is the only way and truth and life. 

I’m proud to say I’m Christian, from the mountain tops!