Archive for ‘History’

November 20, 2015

Gettysburg Address

abraham-lincoln-quotes

I thought it profound to read the President Lincoln speech. It is very short, yet profound. Concise and encapsulating. It takes your breath away. One of the best writings to have been spoken since the origin of America’s birth. Read it for yourself:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle-field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

Abraham Lincoln

November 19, 1863

February 4, 2014

George Washington and the Fig

I was reading about the Fig and the Fig tree and the Fig leafs and the important association thereof in Biblical history & American History. After the research, what I found was really cool. This is an excerpt from George Washington and his letter to the Hebrew people in a Synagogue in Rhode Island in 1790:

In 1790, the synagogue’s warden, Moses Seixas, wrote to George Washington, expressing his support for Washington’s administration and good wishes for him. Washington sent a letter in response, which read in part:
…the Government of the United States…gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance…May the children of the Stock of Abraham, who dwell in this land, continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other Inhabitants; while every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree, and there shall be none to make him afraid. May the father of all mercies scatter light and not darkness in our paths, and make us all in our several vocations useful here, and in his own due time and way everlastingly happy.”
—Letter of George Washington to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, Rhode Island

The term “under his own vine and fig tree” refer to peace and prosperity.

The biblical quote “each man under his own vine and fig tree” (1 Kings 4:25) has been used to denote peace and prosperity. It was commonly quoted to refer to the life that would be led by settlers in the American West.

Also important was the equality of all Americans, regardless of their faith, to which Washington was poignant.